Printing Terminology R-S

Printing Terminology R-S

Printing Terminology R-S: Old Street, Clerkenwell, Bishopsgate, London EC1, EC2, EC3, EC4, N1.

A generic term for all processes involved in the production of a job prior to it reaching the printing presses. This includes typesetting, artworking, plate production and proofing.

 OVERS

The extra printed products delivered to a customer over and above the net amount ordered, resulting from the consumption of less waste during the production processes than was anticipated. Overs are generally not charged for.

P – Printing Terminology and Facts:

 PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM

(PMS) International system of designating colour for printing, where specific colours are given unique reference numbers. These numbers are prefixed with ‘C’ for coated stock and ‘U’ for uncoated. Note that the same colour will print differently on gloss coated, matt coated and uncoated papers.

PAPER STRETCH

A problem which may occur during printing where the actual size of the paper may be altered bu the effects of humidity and temperature. Can cause problems with fit and registration if not carefully monitored and compensated for during printing.

PERFECT BINDING

A binding method where gathered text sections are held together with glue worked in to the gaps between the different sections at the spine. The bound edge is usually concealed by a drawn-on cover.

PERFECTING

Printing on both sides of a sheet of paper in one pass through a printing machine.

PORTRAIT

A term for any job where the height of the item is greater than the width.

PRINTING PLATE

A metal plate carrying the image to be printed, used in the offset lithography printing process. It is important to realise that each colour in a printing job requires a separate plate.

PROCESS COLOURS

The colours which make up full colour printing: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black.

PROGRESSIVE PROOF

Proof which shows the impression from each individual colour plate and how they progressively build up the full colour image.

PROOF

A printed sample of work to be checked for errors in text, positioning or quality of colour reproduction. There are six main types – laser, digitail and wet proofs.

PRINT HD

(High Definition Printing) With our unique method we are able to produce print that, to the normal human eye, gives the impression of continuous tone printing.

R – Printing Terminology and Facts:

 RAM DIECUTTING

A finishing process whereby shaped edges are cut into multi-page documents using hardened steel cutting formes, or in to single leaves if produced in large quantities.

RESOLUTION

Refers to the degree of detail if an image. It is uusually measured in dots per inch (dpi) or lines per inch (lpi). The higher the resolution the greater the detail.

S – Printing Terminology and Facts:

 SADDLE STITCHING

A method of binding where the folded sections of a brochure are held together using metal wire to form staples punched through the fold of the spine.

SCANNER

The equipment which converts flat images, ie. transparencies, photographic prints, line drawings etc, into a digital image for use on a computer.

SCANS

The name given to digitised images, produced on a scanner from originals such as transparencies, photographic prints, line drawings etc. that are subsequently used to reproduce the originals by way of computerised origination.

SEAL COATING

A coating applied to printed matter that is quick drying and protects literature from ink smuding and finger marking. A sealer generally has a neutral finish, and will not affect the appearance of a printed job.

SET OFF

This is the unintentional transfer of wet ink from one printed sheet to another during the printing proces.

SHEET FED PRESS

Printing presses on which the paper to be printed is fed in as individual sheets, albeit in a continuous stream. They are suitable for all types of commercial printing , particularly high quality work.

SHRINK WRAPPING

Method of packing printed products by surrounding them with a thin plastic film which is then shrunk by heat to form a taut protective covering.

SIDE-WIRE STITCHING

A method of binding where collated single leaves are held together with wire stitches punched through from the front or back close to the spine. The stitches can be hidden by either glueing a separate cover around the spine, or affixing binding tape, as with cheque books.

SPECIAL COLOUR

This is a colour that is specially mixed rather than printed from CMYK and is listed in a Pantone colour swatch book. For example, if a corporate logo contains a special blue and is included in a brochure with photographs and text, this is termed a five-colour job. (CMYK for pictures and text + special blue = five colours).

SPINE OR BINDING EDGE

The side of a printed document on which any binding is applied – or the folded edge on an unbound item – opposite the foredge.

SPINE GLUEING

A method of binding used on booklets that have relatively few pages, in which inset sections are held together by a thin strip of adhesive applied down the folded spines.

SPIRAL BINDING

Method of binding loose leaves (most commonly used for notepads) where a single strand of wire is passed through holes punched on the binding edge of the leaves in a spiral. Should not be confused with wire-o binding.

SRA AND RA SIZES

Two of the series of standard paper sizes, used by printers to define the finished size of printing sheets on which finished A size jobs can be produced. They are oversized sheets, to allow for colour bars, binding margins, glue flaps etc., and considerable savings can be made if such constraints are taken into account when jobs are being designed.

STAB STITCHING

A method of binding where collated single leaves are held together with wire stitches punched through from the front and back close to the spine. The stitches can be hidden by either glueing a separate cover around the spine, or affixing binding tape, as with cheque books.

Brad Malone

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