Printing Terminology C-G

Printing Terminology C-G

Printing Terminology C-G: Shoreditch, Old Street, Clerkenwell, Bishopsgate, London EC1, EC2, EC3, EC4, N1.

Standard sizes for envelopes specifically designed to take items which are based on the A sizes, for example an A4 letterhead (297 x 210mm) fits a C4 envelope (324 x 229mm)

CMYK

Letters which stand for Cyan (C), Magenta (M), Yellow (Y) and Black (K) when producing full colour printing (four colour process). (K is used for black to avoid confusion with Cyan which is the commonly used printing term for blue).

COATED PAPER

Paper which has received a coating to give it a smooth finish – either gloss or matt. A generic classification to differentiate from uncoated papers.

COATER

A dedicated unit on printed presses used for applying varnishes and coatings to sheets.

COMB-BINDING

Method of binding loose leaves with a pre-formed plastic strip that is curled through rectangular holes punched on the binding edge of the leaves

D – Printing Terminology and Facts:

DL ENVELOPE

A standard envelope size measuring 110mm x 220mm which take A4 sheets, folded twice to 99 x 210mm.

DIECUTING

A finishing process whereby apertures or shaped edges can be cut in to single leaves of printed literature.

DIGITAL PROOF

A proof produced from computer files without the use of film or plates. Various types from black and white and colour lasers to Rainbows and Iris proofs (trade names) are available. They are of a reasonably high quality but not as accurate as Cromalins or wet proofs.

DIMENSIONS

Where possible, the dimensions of a printed document should be given with the height shown first, followed by the width – this may sound trivial, but misunderstandings over the dimensions of a job can have serious cost implications.

DOT GAIN

A technical issue which affects the printing process where the size of the printed dot differs from that which was intended in the original design. This can affect colour values if steps are not taken to compensate for it during the origination stage.

DUMMY

An unprinted sample of a proposed job made up with the actual materials

E – Printing Terminology and Facts:

EMBOSSING

A process which raises letters or designs on paper or board using engraved metal dies.

F – Printing Terminology and Facts:

FINISHING

All operations after printing ie. cutting, folding, stitching etc., to produce the finished item.

FLAT SPINES

A type of spine used on the die cut folders where no capacity is required. Made up of a single crease, a flat spine has a ‘V’ shaped profile.

FOIL BLOCKING

A process whereby coloured foil – often metallic – is selectively applied to a printed sheet. Can only be used to reproduce line images, which do not incorporate very fine detail.

FOLIO

Folio’s are sequential numbers used for page identification , where the outside front cover of a job is always termed ‘folio 1’ and the following pages are numbered concurrently with no allowance for blank pages, indexes or anything else which may not have a specific page number.

FOOT

The bottom edge of a printed document at right angles to the spine and opposite the head.

FONT

A set of letters, numbers and symbols that share a unified design. The design is called a typeface.

FOREDGE

The side of a printed document opposite to and parallel with the spine.

FOUR COLOUR PROCESS

Full colour printing using four constituent colours: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black.

G – Printing Terminology and Facts:

GSM

Grammes per square metre. Standard measurement of paper weight.

GLOSS COATED PAPER

An art paper which has a polished surface coating to give an even, shiny finish. Gloss papers are in essence exactly the same as matt, or silk papers, but have more pressure applied during the ‘polishing’aspect of manufacture (known as calendaring) to give the smoother, more shiny finished surface.

GLOSS VARNISH

A varnish applied to printed sheet to protect against scuffing and marking, giving a gloss finish.

GRAINING

A process used to apply an overall textured finish to printed sheets using engraved granite rollers to impress the required image in to the sheet. A similar finish can be applied to specific areas of a sheet using standard embossing.

GUSSET SPINES

A type of spine used on die cut folders to give variable capacity on pockets etc. Made up of three separate creases, a gusset spine has a ‘W’ shaped profile.

Brad Malone

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